Today: July 14, 2024

Globe Does Film

At 8pm on Monday 19th September, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s classic 1928 silent film The Passion Of Joan Of Arc, will be screened in London’s iconic Globe Theatre. Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp) have created a new score for The Passion Of Joan Of Arc, which will be performed as a live accompaniment to the film on the Globe stage. This combination of a film and live score is a first for the Globe Theatre.

Charles Hazlewood will conduct a group of 24 musicians, including Adrian Utley and Will Gregory, six electric guitars, members of the Monteverdi Choir, percussion, horns, harp and synthesizers. The Passion Of Joan of Arc stars Renee Jeanne Falconetti as Joan and is widely regarded as a landmark of cinema, with Falconetti’s performance often listed as one of the finest in cinema history.

Adrian Utley is a member of Portishead, who rose to fame with the 1994 album Dummy, which lead to a nomination for Best British Newcomer at the 1995 Brit Awards, and in 2003, the album was named in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

Will Gregory is best known as the lead keyboardist, producer and composer with electronic music duo Goldfrapp, which he formed in 1999 with vocalist Alison Goldfrapp. Their debut album ‘Felt Mountain’ was shortlisted for the Mercury Prize, and later albums were twice Grammy nominated.

From 2005 – 2009 Charles Hazelwood was Principal Guest Conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra, with whom he appeared several times at the BBC Proms in the Royal Albert Hall. From 1995 – 2003, Charles was Music Director for Broomhill Opera and Wilton’s Music Hall. He has conducted over 50 world premieres and is a passionate advocate of new work and broadening access to orchestral music, including appearances on television fronting documentaries on British music.

This special performance marks the culminations of this summer’s Wonder Women series at Shakespeare’s Globe.

For more information visit: http://www.shakespearesglobe.com

Paula Hammond - Features Editor

Paula Hammond is a full-time, freelance journalist. She regularly writes for more magazines than is healthy and has over 25 books to her credit. When not frantically scribbling, she can be found indulging her passions for film, theatre, cult TV, sci-fi and real ale. If you should spot her in the pub, after five rounds rapid, she’ll be the one in the corner mumbling Ghostbusters quotes and waiting for the transporter to lock on to her signal… Email: writerpaula@icloud.com

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