Today: April 17, 2024

The Daleks in Colour Unboxing

BBC took a big risk with The Daleks in Colour – fans of Doctor Who are notorious for their passionate and purist approach to their beloved series, so to not only colourise but also re-edit one of the most iconic adventures in the timelord’s canon was certainly a fascinating move. The results, thankfully for fans and casual viewers alike, is a technical marvel. The cololurisation is probably the finest ever achieved (whether you agree with it in principle or not), and the new re-edit brings the dated serial into the now for new viewers to enjoy. This wonderful project has been clearly built with love for the source material and as a way to introduce modern fans to the early days of Doctor Who. A fascinating and rewarding project and one that shouldn’t cause too much offence to the purists and cultural conservationists as the original black and white series is provided on an included DVD.

Originally transmitted from December 1963 to February 1964, The Daleks introduced one of the Doctor’s most formidable and enduring foes.

The story follows the very first crew of the TARDIS as they land in a petrified forest on an alien planet. Determined to explore, the Doctor (William Hartnell) leads his companions into the metal city, where they discover danger at every corner and what will become his deadliest enemy, the mutant Daleks.

The seven original 25 minute episodes have now been colourised and weaved together into a 75 minute blockbuster. With brand new sound and a new score – created by Mark Ayres – The Daleks has been gloriously updated, whilst ensuring the original classic story remains as thrilling as it was when it was first seen back in 1963.

This release also includes the original seven episodes on DVD in black & white, as they were first broadcast plus a 15 minute exclusive featurette and all special features from the previous release.

Alex Moss Editor

Alex Moss’ obsession with film began the moment he witnessed the Alien burst forth from John Hurt’s stomach. It was perhaps ill-advised to witness this aged 6 but much like the beast within Hurt, he became infected by a parasite called ‘Movies’. Rarely away from his computer or a big screen, as he muses on Cinematic Deities, Alex is “more machine now than man. His mind is twisted and evil”. Email: alex.moss@filmjuice.com

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