Today: July 18, 2024

The Death Of Superman

If superhero movies were sandwiches then you’d probably take them back to the shop. Not very adventurous, with a thin daub of plot-jam, sold as a luxury product in an artisan SFX wrap. DC Universes’ animated features, however, are a whole different dining experience. The visual bread may look a bit budget, but there’s so much filling you can barely get the thing in your mouth. 

Ok, maybe that’s an analogy too far but, let’s face it, live action movies are big business and they can’t afford to take chances. So plots get watered-down, characters become stereotypes. And generally that’s fine. Especially when it comes to superhero movies because even if the plot-holes have plot-holes, guys in tights and power-armer hitting each other is never going to get old. But, if you’re looking for a superhero fix that’s less comic and more book, then DC/Warner Brother’s animated features have you covered.

The Death Of Superman is their latest release—based on the  comic book of the same name. The film, which chronicles the battle between Superman and Doomsday is the 32nd instalment in the Animated Universe series and the eleventh full-length film. Those with long memories might recall that Superman Doomsday (which was the first DC Animated movie) told a shorter and much-abridged version of the seminal comic book storyline. This new take on the tale restores many of the moments and characters that fans hold dear while fitting nicely into the new, wider DC Animated Universe. 

As always with these releases you can expect diverse, well-visualised characters, and ballsy storylines that pack an emotional punch. The voice actors are superb–look out especially for Nathan Captain Tight Pants Fallion whose take on Green Lantern is laugh out loud. The release includes a Limited Edition Blu-ray packed with a graphic novel, a LimitedEdition  Steelbook, and a Limited Edition Blu-ray with mini-fig.

The sequel, Reign Of The Supermen, will be released in 2019, continuing this most famous of story arcs.

Paula Hammond - Features Editor

Paula Hammond is a full-time, freelance journalist. She regularly writes for more magazines than is healthy and has over 25 books to her credit. When not frantically scribbling, she can be found indulging her passions for film, theatre, cult TV, sci-fi and real ale. If you should spot her in the pub, after five rounds rapid, she’ll be the one in the corner mumbling Ghostbusters quotes and waiting for the transporter to lock on to her signal… Email: writerpaula@icloud.com

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