Posted June 28, 2011 by Marcia Degia - Publisher in Features
 
 

Film Video Games


Over the years, films adapted into video games have gained a bad reputation in the gaming world, especially with clangers such as ET: The Extraterrestrial, Cat Woman

Over the years, films adapted into video games have gained a bad reputation in the gaming world, especially with clangers such as ET: The Extraterrestrial, Cat Woman and Reservoir Dogs, which failed to capture the feel of Tarantino’s iconic movie. However, while it would be easier to write a list of movie-to-video-game disasters, over the years some films have been immortalised on to the small screen to huge success; some even bettering the origin material. With Transformers: Dark of the Moon as the latest to join the list, FilmJuice uncovers the best movie-to-video-game games, old and new, that film fans and video gamers alike will relish.

The Chronicle of Riddick: Butcher Bay (2004)

Why it Works: A prequel to the movie franchise, The Chronicle of Riddick, starring Vin Diesel – who was involved in the making of the video game – reprises his role as Richard B. Riddick (who is also the main character in the prequel film Pitch Black). Riddick is a psychopathic murderer who attempts to escape a high security prison called Butcher Bay. The team who made the game purposely tried to distance the game from its origin material, which was mostly panned by critics. The player takes on the persona of Riddick in this first-person-shooter as he tries to escape Butcher Bay by means of shoot-outs, hand to hand combat and stealth.

Best Bits: A solid story and strong characters, plus exquisite visuals – there really are never any dull moments. Each inmate the player comes across has his own unique character with their own name, voice, and likeness, which lends the game a sense of depth and personality. Detailed touches like these make Butcher Bay a winner. It’s available on X Box and PC. To Buy, Click Here.

Spider Man 2 (2004)

Why it Works: As is obvious, Spider Man 2 is based on the second movie. However, as never seen before, Spider Man 2 simulates Spider Man’s web swinging in three dimensions, creating a new game mechanic unlike the traditional jumping or flying of previous Spider-Man games. It also allows the player to take on the movie’s plot, which involves fighting Dr Otto Octavious, or simply roam New York solving random crimes.

Best Bits: Probably the best thing about Spider Man 2 the video game is that the player can simply take their time roaming New York, swinging from the Empire State Building and around New York scouting for secret tokens as if they were Spider Man themselves. They can even chose to deliver pizza or help a kid find his balloon. So, even if the plot is slightly re-hashed, the excellent graphics and freedom of New York more than make up for this. Available in versions for PlayStation 2, GameCube and Xbox. To Buy, Click Here.

The Warriors (2005)

Why it Works: Based on the 1979 American cult action thriller film by Walter Hill and on Sol Yurick’s 1965 novel of the same name. The film is about a gang called The Warriors who are wrongly accused of killing another gang leader. The Warriors must get back to Coney Island while fighting off other gangs gunning for them along the way. The video game version has gained the same cult status as its source material, partly due to getting the concept of huge gang fighting scenes right. The player is completely shrouded by individual fight outs although working as a group, awakening the inner rebel fighter in the player who has to fight against the masses over an injustice on the streets while secretly wanting to claim the worn streets as your own.

Best Bits: The game manages to stretch a two-hour film in to a 12 hour credible game with many of the original actors reprising their roles. Plus, with co-op multi-player capabilities, un-lockable games and an excellent sound track and audio, The Warriors comprises street fighting and a cult classic to great effect. Available for PlayStation 2, Xbox and PlayStation Portable. To Buy, Click Here.

Golden Eye 007 (N64) (1997)

Why it Works: As you may of guessed Golden Eye is based on the Bond film made two years earlier. Golden Eye 007 is on this list because it is a video game with real staying power. A first person shooter, it encompasses everything that is Bond; shooting Russians in the head from 200 yards with a sniper rifle, turning your hand to countless mission objectives spread over 12 environments and with three difficulty ratings – 007 himself would be so proud. It also, unlike many video games, closely mirrors the plot of the 17th Bond movie of which it’s based.

Best Bits: A daring bungee jump to start the player off – as in the film – breathtaking graphics of Cuban jungles and instillations deep under the snow, all accompanied by atmospheric music. However, best of all, the player gets to enact all those super slick Bond manoeuvres, such as escaping a train seconds before it explodes. Available on Nintendo 64 video game console. Another Golden Eye game was released in 2010 for Nintendo Wii and Nintendo DS. To Buy, Click Here.

X Men Origins Wolverine (2009)

Why it Works: Released to co-inside with the movie (which critically received mixed reviews) the game, due to its raw brutality and excellent showcase of Wolverine’s powers, was received better than its big screen sister. Not for the faint hearted, throughout the excellent game-play Wolverine shows what real damage can be done with razor sharp claws and the screen is regularly blood soaked. The story line in the game expands on those in the film taking you through the jungles of Africa, the hidden Weapon X base at Alkali Lake, the interior (and exterior) of a massive casino, to name but a few locations.

Best Bits: The player is allowed to launch Wolverine at enemies from a distance and each time they reach a new level they are entrusted with new, more intricate abilities. Also, there are four different fury attacks, which are super-moves that require you to build up your rage meter before unleashing, giving Wolverine some kind of player customisation. But one of the best elements of Wolverine is the many ways he can destroy an opponent – nothing is too gruesome for this super mutant. Available on PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Windows, Wii, PlayStation 2, Nintendo DS and PlayStation Portable. To Buy, Click Here.

The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (2003)

Why it Works: This cross platform third person hack and slash video game based on the third and final instalment of this stellar film franchise, Return of the King picks up where the previous video game of the second film, The Two Towers, left off and is considerably better. Game review website gamespot.uk perfectly describes the premise of Return of the King: “Gandalf’s arrival at the break of dawn with the Riders of Rohan. The defenders of Helm’s Deep are being overrun by the evil forces of Sauron, but Gandalf’s perfectly timed intervention swings the momentum of the battle in favour of the forces of good, putting Sauron’s armies into full retreat. As Gandalf, you’ll smash through legions of the villainous uruk-hai, scale the castle walls to assist Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli, and rupture the enemy’s supply lines, all while war wages all around you.”

Best Bits: The structure properly represents how the wizard, hobbit and king all go their separate ways and how their efforts are all for the common good in the film, which will please movie fans. Depending on whose path you chose – either the king, wizard or hobbit – you can chose between a variety of characters to play. For example, in the path of the king, you’ll be able to choose from Aragorn the ranger, Legolas the archer, or Gimli the dwarf. The player will find hundreds of enemies and each level effectively encapsulates the chaos feel of the movies. Available on PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube, Xbox and PC. To Buy, Click Here.

King Kong (2005)

Why it works: This classic story originating from 1933 was remade by Peter Jackson in 2005, who then collaborated with famed videogame designer Michel Ancel (Rayman, Beyond Good & Evil), to make King Kong the video game. The game blends first person action sequences with third person components to create a six-hour video game (yes, quite short, isn’t it?). The player can traverse the perils of Skull Island as both screenwriter Jack Driscoll and the 800-pound gorilla himself, King Kong. There’s voice-overs by Adrien Brody, Jack Black and Naomi Watts, who act out the opening premise of the film which is filmmaker Carl Denham in a fit of desperation because he has learnt the studio is going to scrap his film, in a desperate bid to get it made he heads to Skull Island.

Best Bits: Featuring atmospheric art design and the fantastic voice-overs, sound effects and soundtrack, King Kong is a winner. Players will encounter angry dinosaurs, 10-foot-long millipedes, hordes of giant scorpions and bats to name just a few enemies, all of which can be dispatched with a Tommy-Gun, spears or a shot gun. However, the best bit is probably swinging through the trees as Kong himself and taking out enemies with his ferocious arm. To Buy, Click Here.

Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011)

Why it works: Ending with a newbie, Transformers Dark of the Moon video game was released on the 24th of June (five days before the actual film) and it has received some rave reviews from the UK and US. Dark of the Moon features two core gameplay systems: vehicular combat and third-person, Gears of War-style shooting. Unlike the films the video game is speeded up, leaving out much of Shia LaBeouf, and focuses on explosive battle missions, where the player can take out his enemy using a machine gun or a type of grenade launcher.

Best Bits: Crystal clear images of destroyed wasteland make up much of the scenery, where vehicles invade from every angle, making this a non-stop, action packed adventure, where, if you want a brief break, you’ll have to hit the pause button. Transformers fans will no doubt be delighted with this all out action offering, while those less enthusiastic will find more than enough to keep them entertained – especially when playing online where up to 10 Transformers can battle it out at once. Available on PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii, Nintendo DS, and Nintendo 3DS. To Buy, Click Here.

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Marcia Degia - Publisher

 
Marcia Degia has worked in the media industry for more than 10 years. She was previously Acting Managing Editor of Homes and Gardens magazine, Publishing Editor at Macmillan Publishers and Editor of Pride Magazine. Marcia, who has a Masters degree in Screenwriting, has also been involved in many broadcast projects. Among other things, she was the devisor of the documentary series Secret Suburbia for Living TV.