Posted May 13, 2011 by Alex Moss Editor in C
 
 

Cold Weather DVD


An original little caper yarn that refuses to conform to expectations

An original little caper yarn
that refuses to conform to expectations
.

Cold
Weather is a rare treat. By all accounts it is a film that, on paper, should
not work and yet in spite of its odd premise it does. By taking a well-known
genre, in this case a detective thriller, and mixing it with characters from
the slacker genre writer-director Aaron
Katz
has conjured a hugely enjoyable story.

Doug
(Lankenau), a former forensic
scientist drop-out, returns to his hometown of Portland to live with his sister
Gail (Dunn). Having no real aims in
life he takes a job at an ice factory and meets new friend Carlos (Castillo).
Soon his ex-girlfriend Rachel (Rikoon)
is back in town and the four friends waste away the hours drinking and playing
rummy. However, when Rachel goes missing Carlos is adamant that something
untoward has happened to her and convinces Doug to help track her down.

Both
the trailer and visuals of Cold Weather hint at something akin to Christopher Nolan’s remake of Insomnia (2002). More Film Grey than
Film Noir it implies that menace is lurking beyond the next reel. However, in
essence the film is more closely related to indie spirited, mumblecore films
like In Search Of A Midnight Kiss
(2007). Katz spends the first half of the film drawing us into the head space
of the characters, in particular Doug. It is only after we fully comprehend
their outlooks on life that the film switches tack to the more investigatory
nature. With this in mind comparisons can be drawn to Monsters (2010), in the
way it is a character drama disguised in a genre specific shell.

The
pacing is often lethargic and feels overly drawn-out. However, in projecting
this sentiment we are placed firmly in the headspace of Doug. He is a very laid
back character and it is only when he thinks someone he cares about is in peril
that he is shocked into any kind of action. Crucially though Cold Weather is
never a break-neck thrill ride. Doug and his cohorts are not the infamous Sherlock Holmes they model themselves
on. They are amateur sleuths who improvise as they go along. It is through this
that the film draws some carefully placed dry humour. In one instance they
track down one of the suspects convinced he is a mysterious criminal and
pornographer. As they stakeout his house Gail turns to Doug and asks if he is
sure it is the right place, the response is a wonderfully entertaining; “Yeah
his name’s on the buzzer”. Hardly the actions of a man trying to be
conspicuous.

The
cast help draw you into the overall mood and feel of the piece. As Gail,
Trieste Kelly Dunn brings a level head that belies her lonesome insecurities.
Robyn Rikoon gives a nice, if fleeting, turn as Rachel bringing a fun audience
perspective on what Doug and his friends are up to. But it is Cris Lankenau who
truly sells the film. His portrayal of Doug, all slack-jawed and glazed eyes,
fully envelops you into the character’s motivations.

Cold
Weather is a film of two halves but it works surprisingly well because of them.
Katz draws you into his character’s way of thinking so completely that come the
end it all makes perfect sense. It might
be slow paced and the end will leave some scratching their head, but this is an
indie film that is warm and fun. Weather forecast says you’re in for a treat.



To Pre-Order Cold Weather On DVD Click Here


Alex Moss Editor

 
Alex Moss’ obsession with film began the moment he witnessed the Alien burst forth from John Hurt’s stomach. It was perhaps ill-advised to witness this aged 6 but much like the beast within Hurt, he became infected by a parasite called ‘Movies’. Rarely away from his computer or a big screen, as he muses on Cinematic Deities, Alex is “more machine now than man. His mind is twisted and evil”. Email: alex.moss@filmjuice.com