Posted November 16, 2011 by Alex Moss Editor in DVD/Blu-ray
 
 

Zookeeper DVD


Need help with your love life? Then why not look to animals to give you a helping hand? Frank Coraci, the man responsible for The Wedding Singer and Waterboy, brings us Zookeeper.

Need help with your love life? Then why not look to animals to give you a helping hand? Frank Coraci, the man responsible for The Wedding Singer and Waterboy, brings us Zookeeper.

 

Kevin James is Griffin, a hapless, but loveable zookeeper who outdoes himself in his job,
caring for the animals just that little bit more. He is not so successful in his love life, jilted by his girlfriend, Stephanie (Leslie Bibb) after a romantic marriage proposal and feeling like a general nobody. Blinded by his infatuation of Stephanie, Griffin decides that quitting his low paid job and becoming a high-powered car salesman might be the answer to getting back his woman. Enter, the zoo animals, who do not want him to leave and miss out on all the care and goodies he provides. They decide to take Griffin’s love life
in to their own, well, paws and yes folks, they can talk.

 

Zookeeper suggests that to be successful in love you could learn something from animals, taking things back to the basics of nature. In some hysterical scenes, Griffin learns mating techniques from each different animal, with the bears (Jon Favreau and Faizon Love) encouraging him to thrust his chest out and dig up dirt and the wolf (Bas Rutten) claiming that the secret to getting a female is in fact, ‘pee pee.’ However, despite these techniques, the animals help Griffin forget about Stephanie and find true love in the form of fellow zookeeper, Kate (Rosario Dawson), just by being himself.

 

There is nothing like giving animals a voice to make kids smile, we only have to look at the success of movies like Babe or Dr. Dolittle. This one is no exception, with comedy
voices including Cher, Adam Sandler, Judd Apatow, Maya Rudolph
and Sylvester Stallone giving great character
to the animals – Sly in particular does a great king of the jungle and Sandler
a perfect ‘cheekie chappie’ monkey.
The comedic personalities of the animals will have kids giggling
uncontrollably.

 

Zookeeper is reminiscent of Night at the Museum, with the animals gathering together in ‘town
hall’ fashion after dark and it matches this movie in the comedy stakes. If your sides split watching Kevin
James as Albert doing his infamous dance to Usher in movie, Hitch, then this movie is for you. You will particularly enjoy the scene
when Griffin takes the lonely gorilla, Bernie (Nick Nolte), to TGI Fridays for his birthday, sitting in the front
seats of his white van and rocking out to Flo-Rida as they drive along. The relationship between Griffin and
Bernie is particularly poignant as they see themselves in one another, both
lonely and disillusioned by humans in some form. In this sense, there are of course a few tear-jerking moments
and these are glossed over by comedy as they are in most movies of this type. What we get in the form of jokes is
good, but it does leave us hankering for more.

 

Zookeeper gives a nice outlook on the relationship and
communication between humans and animals.
The movie is some family-friendly fun, providing the perfect quantity of
tom foolery and slapstick for the kids, with laughs and in-jokes for the adults
and the right amount of romance.
It would make a nice stocking filler and if you pop it in the DVD player
on Boxing Day as a movie to bring the family together post-Christmas, it won’t
disappoint.


Alex Moss Editor

 
Alex Moss’ obsession with film began the moment he witnessed the Alien burst forth from John Hurt’s stomach. It was perhaps ill-advised to witness this aged 6 but much like the beast within Hurt, he became infected by a parasite called ‘Movies’. Rarely away from his computer or a big screen, as he muses on Cinematic Deities, Alex is “more machine now than man. His mind is twisted and evil”. Email: alex.moss@filmjuice.com