Today: April 17, 2024

February Round Up

Wrap up warm, come in from the cold and make the most of a cracking month of cinema.

Wrap up warm, come in
from the cold and make the most of a cracking month of cinema.

The Book Club in
Shoreditch, East London, is treating visitors to a screening of Larry Clark’s latest
feature Marfa Girl on February the
12th. Centred around 15 year-old Adam (Adam Mediano) the film approaches sexual frustration and
adolescence in the Texan town of Marfa.

To attend please send your name
to info@wearetbc.com with the subject MARFA GIRL SCREENING along with the names
of anyone you want to bring along (you can bring up to four people.)

For further details, head to the
Club’s Facebook page HERE.

Returning to London’s Southbank for its sixth edition, the BFI Future Film Festival arrives on
February the 16th for a long weekend of events and screenings
designed to encourage film makers to develop their career. With each day
dedicated to a separate medium, the programme is divided into fiction,
animation and documentary genres, with a selection of films, Q&As and
workshops dedicated to each. My Brother the Devil (Main Picture) director Sally
El Hosaini
will be giving a Q&A on Saturday’s Fiction line-up following
a screening of her feature directorial debut, Sam Fell, director of last year’s ParaNorman will be opening events on Animation Sunday, and there’s
enough master classes and discussions to see you taking on your first feature
with aplomb.

The full programme and booking options can be found on the
festival homepage HERE

Across the border in February you’ll find a whole month’s
worth of events for the Glasgow Film
Festival
. The festival itself runs from the 14th until its
Academy Award night on the 24th of February, with sister festivals
Glasgow Youth Film Festival and Glasgow Short Film Festival running alongside
it.

Special events include James
Cosmo
in conversation, a cinema city walking tour, a Calamity Jane Barn Dance and a Game
of Thrones
Screening and Panel Discussion. Film4 Fright Fest is back as a
sub fest with some grizzly and gruesome viewing boasting titles like Bring Me the Head of the Machine Gun Woman
and Sawney: The Flesh Man. With
thoughtfully constructed programmes with themes like Crossing the Line and
Stranger than Fiction, expect a colourful and thoughtful month of film.

You can find this ample selection of cinema at the festival
website HERE

Mancunians can catch up with one of the country’s busiest
screenwriters as Abi Morgan stops by
at the Cornerhouse for a Q&A.
Notably penning recent award winners Shame
and The Iron Lady and acclaimed Cold
War drama series The Hour, the BAFTA
winning writer will be in conversation with author Jeanette Winterson (Oranges
Are Not The Only Fruit, Gut Symmetries, The Stone Gods)in association of
The University of Manchester.

Book your tickets HERE

Beth Webb - Events Editor

I aim to bring you a round up of the best film events in the UK, no matter where you are or what your preference. For live coverage of events across London, follow @FilmJuice

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