Today: February 25, 2024

Identity Thief

Spinning into the foreground of the comedy scene with a rib-tickling supporting performance in 2011’s Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy’s series of knock on roles begins as the fraudulent Diana in Identity Thief.

Spinning into the
foreground of the comedy scene with a rib-tickling supporting performance in
2011’s
Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy’s series of knock on roles
begins as the fraudulent Diana in Identity Thief.

 

Directed by Horrible
Bosses’ Seth Gordon
, Diana’s world collides with one of her victims, played
by a relentlessly nice Jason Bateman,
as he tries to retrieve his credibility and his job following her weighty
spending spree carried out at his expense.

 

Sticking to a formula found more recently in films like Due Date, the odd pair must drive
resentfully from Florida to Denver to clear the name of Bateman’s Sandy and help Diana escape a couple of shady accomplices
that she’s double-crossed. Catastrophic events ensue, with expected smattering
of minor explosions, heavy drinking and hilarious dancefloor antics. Sandy’s
harmless disposition (when he’s not openly attacking Diana) paired with his
thief’s foul mouth and boisterous attitude mostly make for pleasant viewing as
they bicker and barter across the States, with a handful of “Oh it’s xxx from
that US comedy” cameos to keep events moving along.

 

Though the narrative is unmuddled, bar a bizarre and
pointless subplot involving bounty hunters, screenplay writer Craig Mazin, who holds two Scary Movies
and two Hangovers to his name sticks firmly within the caper movie box,
resulting in overly comfortable and occasionally bland scenarios with swearing,
cult references and slapstick carrying the weight of the film.

 

Its McCarthy’s timing coupled with her undeniable charm that
make Identity Thief’s enjoyable
moments. Switching from bolshie to vulnerable with ease, like Zach Galifianakis,
she’s found a winning combination and stuck to it, with upcoming cop comedy The Heat hinting there’s more of this
to come. Without her there would
be little of a movie to make; Bateman fills the shoes of the hard done by
family man but brings nothing else to the table and the plot alone is thin.

 

For fans of the Hangover franchise and its predecessors,
this will be a pleasing though not excellent, way to spend an evening. For
those expecting anything other than a 111 minutes of foreseeable mishaps and a
blatant ending perhaps steer clear.

 

Beth Webb - Events Editor

I aim to bring you a round up of the best film events in the UK, no matter where you are or what your preference. For live coverage of events across London, follow @FilmJuice

Previous Story

Dark Shadows

Next Story

Hell Is A City

Latest from Blog

Memory

Memory (2023)

Memory is an exquisite American drama in the tender embrace of Michel Franco’s cinematic prowess.

Paths of Glory

Paths of Glory is a curious beast. It’s a war film whose battles are mostly fought in a court room. It’s a Kubrick epic, that feels like a small, claustrophobic indie movie.

Monolith

Monolith is a film that delights and surprises in equal measure. This low-fi, slow burn thriller is part science fiction, part social commentary, with just the right amount of bumps and jumps

Billions Complete Series Unboxing

As Paul Giamatti remains a frontrunner in the race for this year’s Academy Award for Best Actor with his beautifully layered performance in The Holdovers, there’s no better time to catch up

Beverly Hills Cop Trilogy Unboxing

The heat is on. Eddie Murphy’s beloved street-smart Detroit cop Axel Foley is coming back to our screens in the highly-anticipated fourth entry in the Beverly Hills Cop series this summer, so

Footloose Steelbook Unboxing

One of the quintessential films of the 1980s, the endearingly cheesy Footloose has a ridiculous premise – a town that bans dancing – but it’s hard not to get swept up in
Go toTop