Today: May 27, 2024

Nosferatu 100th Anniversary Screenings

In 1922 one film changed cinema and defined screen terror.  100 years later, it continues to haunt and terrify audiences.  2022 brings the centenary of the most influential horror film of all time. The turning point in the career of legendary director F.W. Murnau (Sunrise, The Last Laugh), the screen’s first, albeit unauthorised adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (which itself celebrates its 125th Anniversary this year) features Max Schreck’s unforgettable performance as the vampire Count Orlok, the most chilling portrayal of cadaverous evil in film history. Although a court order to destroy the film was successfully brought by Stoker’s widow, some copies escaped, and subsequently gave the 20th century some of its defining images of supernatural terror and dread. A decades-long search for the best surviving material and a re-recording of the original score by Hans Erdmann now allows us to see the film exactly as it premiered 100 years ago.

Remade by Werner Herzog in 1979 (and inspiring films as diverse as Abel Ferrara’s King of New York and The Addiction, and E. Elias Merhige’s Shadow of the Vampire), F. W. Murnau’s surreal 1922 cine-fable remains the original and landmark entry in the entire global tradition of “the horror film”. A towering masterpiece whose legacy is truly incalculable, Nosferatu remains as mesmerising – and haunting – as ever.

In celebration of the centenary, Nosferatu will be returning to cinemas in the UK & Ireland throughout 2022.  Screenings will be announced via www.nosferatu100.co.uk

★★★★★ “Masterpiece” – The Times

★★★★★ “So this is it: ground zero, the birth of horror cinema” – Time Out

 ★★★★★ “This romantic fantasia of evil helped invent a whole vocabulary of thriller storytelling” – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

★★★★★ “The most frightening incarnation of the vampire count in horror history” – Alan Jones, Radio Times

★★★★★ “A visual and emotional treat” – Kim Newman, Empire

 ★★★★★ “deliciously creepy” – The Independent

★★★★★ “This grainy yet ethereal incarnation of Bram Stoker’s tale is still the best.” – Mail on Sunday

Paula Hammond - Features Editor

Paula Hammond is a full-time, freelance journalist. She regularly writes for more magazines than is healthy and has over 25 books to her credit. When not frantically scribbling, she can be found indulging her passions for film, theatre, cult TV, sci-fi and real ale. If you should spot her in the pub, after five rounds rapid, she’ll be the one in the corner mumbling Ghostbusters quotes and waiting for the transporter to lock on to her signal… Email: writerpaula@icloud.com

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