Today: February 22, 2024

The 4th London Brazilian Film Festival

Striding back to Piccadilly Circus for it’s for its 4th year, the Brazilian Film Festival rounds up the summer festival season with a brighter and bolder selection of domestic cinema from the 21st to the 25th of September.

Striding back to
Piccadilly Circus for it’s for its 4th year, the Brazilian Film
Festival rounds up the summer festival season with a brighter and bolder
selection of domestic cinema from the 21st to the 25th of
September.

The festival for the past three years has welcomed such
guests as Sir Ben Kingsley and Ronnie Wood and strives to introduce
the best of the Brazil’s contemporary cinema to our capital as well as raising
awareness to everything from current issues within Brazil, national heritage
and local tradition.

Closing the 4th Festival is the premiere of Fernando Meirelles’ latest feature Xingu (Main Picture). The film is produced by Meirelles, who
previously directed City of God and The Constant Gardener and is directed
by Cao Hamburger, and follows
three brothers dramatic mission across central Brazil in the 1940’s.

Based on a true course of events, the film caused ripples of approval
at the Tribeca Film Festival this year and proves a promising conclusion
to a varied and colourful five day programme.

Opening night begins with Ana Rieper’s documentary I’ll
Raffle My Heart
. Awarded best direction and best editing at the 7th FestiCine Goiânia in Brazil,
Rieper’s raucous and romantic feature centres around the works of the most
important composers of brega, a popular genre of Brazilian music which
translates as “cheesy,” and how it effects those that listen to it.

Following a musical theme, Raul follows the life of rock idol Raul Seixas through interviews of those that knew him best.
Director
Walter Carvalho
juxtaposes archive footage and testimonials to document the life of a musician
deemed the “Father of Brazilian Rock.” The film rounds off
Saturday’s programme, which includes Rodrigo
Bittencourt’s
slum based favela
spoof Totally Innocent, and
family drama My Country starring Love Actually and Che star Rodrigo Santoro.

Sunday starts with Jorge
Mautner, The Son of the Holocaust
. Branded the most important philosopher
of a generation, Mautner was a musician, poet and pop star that hugely
contributed to Brazilian culture in the 20th century, which Pedro
Bial
and Heitor D’Alincourt record through interviews and footage of
his work. Also showing that day is Vladimir Carvalho’s Rock Brasilia,
which shows archive footage of the cultural and ideological construction of
Brazil’s Federal Capital.

Films are opened by
a short feature with everything from comedy to animation to start of the
screening. Various Q&As, panels
and performances will be announced closer to the time. For more information
visit the Brazilian Film Festival homepage HERE

Beth Webb - Events Editor

I aim to bring you a round up of the best film events in the UK, no matter where you are or what your preference. For live coverage of events across London, follow @FilmJuice

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