Posted April 17, 2012 by Alex Moss Editor in DVD/Blu-ray
 
 

Transit


Having just done 18 months in chokey for committing land fraud and tax evasion, Nate Sidwell (Jim Caviezel) just wants to win back the love and trust of wife Robyn (Elisabeth Röhm) and sons Shane (Sterling Knight) and Kenny (Jake Cherry) and he thinks a camping holiday down Louisiana way may be just what the doctor ordered.

Having just done 18 months in chokey for
committing land fraud and tax evasion, Nate Sidwell (Jim Caviezel) just wants
to win back the love and trust of wife Robyn (Elisabeth Röhm) and sons Shane (Sterling
Knight) and Kenny (Jake Cherry) and he thinks a camping holiday down Louisiana
way may be just what the doctor ordered.

Unfortunately,
bug-eyed loon Marek (bug-eyed loon James
Frain
) and his gang (sweaty, woefully miscast Harold Perrineau, blandly sexy Diora
Baird
and forgettable Ryan Donowho)
have just violently robbed an armoured car and, for reasons that don’t make a
whole lot of sense, have stashed the cash in amongst the Sidwell’s luggage in
order to sneak the money through a roadblock.

Once
through the roadblock, the gang decide to get their swag back by unsuccessfully
trying to run the Sidwells off the road.
Some erratic driving later, Robyn discovers the cash, jumps to the
illogical conclusion that her recently paroled hubby has stolen the money and
kicks him and the dosh to the kerb.
Unfortunately, the baddies will stop at nothing to get their money back,
chasing and terrorising the family.
If the family’s going to survive, it’s up to Nate.

Leaving
aside the fact that the script doesn’t make a lick of sense and everything the
characters (good and bad) do is completely illogical, Transit isn’t that bad.
Make no mistake, it’s not that good either but director Negret keeps things motoring right
along, builds tension nicely and stages some decent action scenes.

While Röhm
frankly comes across as a bit of a shrew (Seriously, in Caviezel’s shoes if you
had a choice between $4million in a bag or saving your wife who’s frankly a bit
of a judgemental cow, what would you do?) and the usually reliable Perrineau
fails to convince as a machete-wielding psycho, Caviezel and Frain are adequate
as hero and villain respectively and, at just 84 minutes, at least Transit never gets the chance to wear
out its welcome. Fast-paced and
tense, Transit’s an enjoyable little
ride that you’ll have forgotten by the time you get to the cinema foyer.


Alex Moss Editor

 
Alex Moss’ obsession with film began the moment he witnessed the Alien burst forth from John Hurt’s stomach. It was perhaps ill-advised to witness this aged 6 but much like the beast within Hurt, he became infected by a parasite called ‘Movies’. Rarely away from his computer or a big screen, as he muses on Cinematic Deities, Alex is “more machine now than man. His mind is twisted and evil”. Email: alex.moss@filmjuice.com